UI/UX, Product design

Innovating dashboard and predictive analytics

I won first place in an internal company hackathon when I designed a dashboard to help hiring managers and recruiters make decisions informed by product and candidate analytics

4 minutes

Innovating dashboard and predictive analyticsInnovating dashboard and predictive analyticsInnovating dashboard and predictive analytics

My role

A solutions architect and I came up with an idea for a home dashboard for our recruiter portal. I did all the designs and presented an interactive prototype to the whole company. We did not hold back with the complexity or scope, intending to show everyone how our product could look one day. The project won first place and the leadership team prioritized getting an MVP of a simplified version in the following year.

Client

Mya Systems

Tools

Sketch, Invision

Collaborators

Kyle Underseth

Solutions Architect

Navigation

In college, someone once told me designers couldn't participate in hackathons, only engineers actually "counted." I clearly didn't take that to heart. Upon hearing about the Mya internal hackathon, I decided to address a problem in the product that I felt was extremely detrimental to all of our users. But first, here is some background.

Not who, but what. Mya is an AI chatbot that recruiters can use for inbound and outbound recruiting. Mya can talk to candidates to gather job-related information, gauge interest, answer questions, etc.

Customers could communicate directly with the AI through the Mya Recruiter Portal (MRP), making it an extremely useful and somewhat complex tool. The expected users in the MRP were recruiters and recruiter admins/hiring managers. Users could do a variety of things, like create conversation guidelines for Mya, review information collected in Mya conversations, manage interview schedules, and much more.

One major thing the MRP was lacking was a home dashboard. When users logged in, they were immediately dropped into a busy list view. There were no clear directives, action items, updates, or immediate alerts. This was a problem.

I asked our solutions architect about specific customer pain points related to direction and guidance in the MRP. There were several things he had heard from multiple customers:

  • Things felt scattered. It was hard to know where to go for specific tasks, and sometimes it was hard to even remember what those tasks were. There was no way to keep track of what had and hadn't been done.
  • Quick tasks like sending interview reminders or minor adjustments to jobs, Blueprints, and Campaigns were fairly nested
  • Candidate data and Mya performance analytics were frequent topics. Customers wanted to be able to quantify what their money was doing.

The solutions architect and I brainstormed some potential solutions. Once written out, I began sketching rough designs and eventually created high-fidelity mocks. 3 days later, I had an Invision prototype and a PowerPoint presentation ready to go. The designs were flashy relative to how the actual MRP looked, but our ideas were practical and most features, if not already available, would have been attainable within 6-12 months if prioritized.

These designs are unpolished and imperfect. Their primary objective was to convince my 80 co-workers of the importance of having a home dashboard. It worked.

I opened my presentation by describing the problem. Then, rather than explaining the contents of each screen, I walked the company through two user stories. Here is an example of one:

1.) Kyle is a recruiter admin. He logs into the MRP and is immediately presented with a list of "Unassigned items." An unassigned job is a job posting that Mya, the AI, is unaware of because there is no Conversation Blueprint assigned to it. This means Mya has no guidelines on how to approach a candidate conversation related to that job. A good way to start the da, is for Kyle to assign a Conversation Blueprint to that job.

The "Groundskeeper II" job has received an auto-assignment, based on previous jobs that matched the new post. Kyle can review that auto-assignment or move on to the next. He clicks on Assign Blueprint for the "Sr. Mechanical Engineer" job.

2) A list of recommended Conversation Blueprints pops up. The match percentage is based on the Blueprint assignment  of similar jobs in the past. Kyle wants to first review the Blueprint before assigning and clicks the View button for "Mechanical Engineer (Fulltime)"

3) Kyle reviews the Blueprint. He has the option to modify some of the Blueprint's templated information. He clicks "Assign."

4) Now that a Blueprint has been assigned, the job goes live and Mya can start having conversations with candidates. An empty dashboard shows that no conversation data has come in.

5) Kyle checks back a few days later and is presented with the most qualified candidates, whom he can immediately reach out to. He can also see a deep dive analysis of how Mya and the Conversation Blueprint are performing. He can use this information to adjust the Blueprint as needed.

"These designs are like Dashboard 3.0. I think we can start at Dashboard 0.5"

The project won first place. Four months later, the leadership team prioritized getting an MVP of a simplified version in the following year. Unfortunately, I was not at the company long enough to see it happen, but I did leave them with some cool and slightly more attainable designs.

Innovating dashboard and predictive analytics

UI/UX, Product design

Innovating dashboard and predictive analytics

I won first place in an internal company hackathon when I designed a dashboard to help hiring managers and recruiters make decisions informed by product and candidate analytics

Client

Mya Systems

Tools

Sketch, Invision

Collaborators

Kyle Underseth

Solutions Architect

My role

A solutions architect and I came up with an idea for a home dashboard for our recruiter portal. I did all the designs and presented an interactive prototype to the whole company. We did not hold back with the complexity or scope, intending to show everyone how our product could look one day. The project won first place and the leadership team prioritized getting an MVP of a simplified version in the following year.

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Innovating dashboard and predictive analytics

UI/UX, Product design

Innovating dashboard and predictive analytics

I won first place in an internal company hackathon when I designed a dashboard to help hiring managers and recruiters make decisions informed by product and candidate analytics

4 minutes

My role

A solutions architect and I came up with an idea for a home dashboard for our recruiter portal. I did all the designs and presented an interactive prototype to the whole company. We did not hold back with the complexity or scope, intending to show everyone how our product could look one day. The project won first place and the leadership team prioritized getting an MVP of a simplified version in the following year.

Tools

Sketch, Invision

Collaborators

Kyle Underseth

Solutions Architect

In college, someone once told me designers couldn't participate in hackathons, only engineers actually "counted." I clearly didn't take that to heart. Upon hearing about the Mya internal hackathon, I decided to address a problem in the product that I felt was extremely detrimental to all of our users. But first, here is some background.

Not who, but what. Mya is an AI chatbot that recruiters can use for inbound and outbound recruiting. Mya can talk to candidates to gather job-related information, gauge interest, answer questions, etc.

Customers could communicate directly with the AI through the Mya Recruiter Portal (MRP), making it an extremely useful and somewhat complex tool. The expected users in the MRP were recruiters and recruiter admins/hiring managers. Users could do a variety of things, like create conversation guidelines for Mya, review information collected in Mya conversations, manage interview schedules, and much more.

One major thing the MRP was lacking was a home dashboard. When users logged in, they were immediately dropped into a busy list view. There were no clear directives, action items, updates, or immediate alerts. This was a problem.

I asked our solutions architect about specific customer pain points related to direction and guidance in the MRP. There were several things he had heard from multiple customers:

  • Things felt scattered. It was hard to know where to go for specific tasks, and sometimes it was hard to even remember what those tasks were. There was no way to keep track of what had and hadn't been done.
  • Quick tasks like sending interview reminders or minor adjustments to jobs, Blueprints, and Campaigns were fairly nested
  • Candidate data and Mya performance analytics were frequent topics. Customers wanted to be able to quantify what their money was doing.

The solutions architect and I brainstormed some potential solutions. Once written out, I began sketching rough designs and eventually created high-fidelity mocks. 3 days later, I had an Invision prototype and a PowerPoint presentation ready to go. The designs were flashy relative to how the actual MRP looked, but our ideas were practical and most features, if not already available, would have been attainable within 6-12 months if prioritized.

These designs are unpolished and imperfect. Their primary objective was to convince my 80 co-workers of the importance of having a home dashboard. It worked.

I opened my presentation by describing the problem. Then, rather than explaining the contents of each screen, I walked the company through two user stories. Here is an example of one:

1.) Kyle is a recruiter admin. He logs into the MRP and is immediately presented with a list of "Unassigned items." An unassigned job is a job posting that Mya, the AI, is unaware of because there is no Conversation Blueprint assigned to it. This means Mya has no guidelines on how to approach a candidate conversation related to that job. A good way to start the da, is for Kyle to assign a Conversation Blueprint to that job.

The "Groundskeeper II" job has received an auto-assignment, based on previous jobs that matched the new post. Kyle can review that auto-assignment or move on to the next. He clicks on Assign Blueprint for the "Sr. Mechanical Engineer" job.

2) A list of recommended Conversation Blueprints pops up. The match percentage is based on the Blueprint assignment  of similar jobs in the past. Kyle wants to first review the Blueprint before assigning and clicks the View button for "Mechanical Engineer (Fulltime)"

3) Kyle reviews the Blueprint. He has the option to modify some of the Blueprint's templated information. He clicks "Assign."

4) Now that a Blueprint has been assigned, the job goes live and Mya can start having conversations with candidates. An empty dashboard shows that no conversation data has come in.

5) Kyle checks back a few days later and is presented with the most qualified candidates, whom he can immediately reach out to. He can also see a deep dive analysis of how Mya and the Conversation Blueprint are performing. He can use this information to adjust the Blueprint as needed.

"These designs are like Dashboard 3.0. I think we can start at Dashboard 0.5"

The project won first place. Four months later, the leadership team prioritized getting an MVP of a simplified version in the following year. Unfortunately, I was not at the company long enough to see it happen, but I did leave them with some cool and slightly more attainable designs.

UI/UX, Product design

Innovating dashboard and predictive analytics

I won first place in an internal company hackathon when I designed a dashboard to help hiring managers and recruiters make decisions informed by product and candidate analytics

4 minutes

A solutions architect and I came up with an idea for a home dashboard for our recruiter portal. I did all the designs and presented an interactive prototype to the whole company. We did not hold back with the complexity or scope, intending to show everyone how our product could look one day. The project won first place and the leadership team prioritized getting an MVP of a simplified version in the following year.

Tools

Sketch, Invision

In college, someone once told me designers couldn't participate in hackathons, only engineers actually "counted." I clearly didn't take that to heart. Upon hearing about the Mya internal hackathon, I decided to address a problem in the product that I felt was extremely detrimental to all of our users. But first, here is some background.

Not who, but what. Mya is an AI chatbot that recruiters can use for inbound and outbound recruiting. Mya can talk to candidates to gather job-related information, gauge interest, answer questions, etc.

Customers could communicate directly with the AI through the Mya Recruiter Portal (MRP), making it an extremely useful and somewhat complex tool. The expected users in the MRP were recruiters and recruiter admins/hiring managers. Users could do a variety of things, like create conversation guidelines for Mya, review information collected in Mya conversations, manage interview schedules, and much more.

One major thing the MRP was lacking was a home dashboard. When users logged in, they were immediately dropped into a busy list view. There were no clear directives, action items, updates, or immediate alerts. This was a problem.

I asked our solutions architect about specific customer pain points related to direction and guidance in the MRP. There were several things he had heard from multiple customers:

  • Things felt scattered. It was hard to know where to go for specific tasks, and sometimes it was hard to even remember what those tasks were. There was no way to keep track of what had and hadn't been done.
  • Quick tasks like sending interview reminders or minor adjustments to jobs, Blueprints, and Campaigns were fairly nested
  • Candidate data and Mya performance analytics were frequent topics. Customers wanted to be able to quantify what their money was doing.

The solutions architect and I brainstormed some potential solutions. Once written out, I began sketching rough designs and eventually created high-fidelity mocks. 3 days later, I had an Invision prototype and a PowerPoint presentation ready to go. The designs were flashy relative to how the actual MRP looked, but our ideas were practical and most features, if not already available, would have been attainable within 6-12 months if prioritized.

These designs are unpolished and imperfect. Their primary objective was to convince my 80 co-workers of the importance of having a home dashboard. It worked.

I opened my presentation by describing the problem. Then, rather than explaining the contents of each screen, I walked the company through two user stories. Here is an example of one:

1.) Kyle is a recruiter admin. He logs into the MRP and is immediately presented with a list of "Unassigned items." An unassigned job is a job posting that Mya, the AI, is unaware of because there is no Conversation Blueprint assigned to it. This means Mya has no guidelines on how to approach a candidate conversation related to that job. A good way to start the da, is for Kyle to assign a Conversation Blueprint to that job.

The "Groundskeeper II" job has received an auto-assignment, based on previous jobs that matched the new post. Kyle can review that auto-assignment or move on to the next. He clicks on Assign Blueprint for the "Sr. Mechanical Engineer" job.

2) A list of recommended Conversation Blueprints pops up. The match percentage is based on the Blueprint assignment  of similar jobs in the past. Kyle wants to first review the Blueprint before assigning and clicks the View button for "Mechanical Engineer (Fulltime)"

3) Kyle reviews the Blueprint. He has the option to modify some of the Blueprint's templated information. He clicks "Assign."

4) Now that a Blueprint has been assigned, the job goes live and Mya can start having conversations with candidates. An empty dashboard shows that no conversation data has come in.

5) Kyle checks back a few days later and is presented with the most qualified candidates, whom he can immediately reach out to. He can also see a deep dive analysis of how Mya and the Conversation Blueprint are performing. He can use this information to adjust the Blueprint as needed.

"These designs are like Dashboard 3.0. I think we can start at Dashboard 0.5"

The project won first place. Four months later, the leadership team prioritized getting an MVP of a simplified version in the following year. Unfortunately, I was not at the company long enough to see it happen, but I did leave them with some cool and slightly more attainable designs.

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